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Rob’s weekly blog and training update w/c 03/02/2020

REMEMBER TO BRING YOUR 2020 MEMBERSHIP FORMS. See either myself or Trish

 Ideally bring the form back and then please pay by BACS to: Natwest Acc 556137 06224598

“Liv weekly blog” – see below

Also, FULL LIST of Championship fixtures for 2020 – Note Spring Coast 5k has moved to 28th April

Message from the chair:

Last night Tom broke Joshua Fothergill ‘s record of 11:20 set on 26th Sept 2018. A fantastic time Tom Levi 10:53 !! There’s a challenge son for when you come back from your travels.

SUNDAY 2ND FEBRUARY

Glaisdale Rigg, Glaisdale pub (start 10:30am); check necessary kit list

MONDAY 3RD FEBRUARY

Briefing at 7pm, Thirsk School Thirsk School Gym. Clean shoes please. Rolling core work inside

Outdoors. Duncan and Ken are taking an outside group. Hopefully back on the school fields

TUESDAY 4TH FEBRUARY (social run*)

Social run from Thirsk and Sowerby leisure centre at 7pm (meet in foyer) on well-lit paths and pavements. Suitable for all abilities; there will be several stops to run back/regroup, no-one runs by themselves or gets left behind. New and returning Tuesday night runners always welcome.

Route to be decided on the night, around 5 miles. Please wear high vis.

WEDNESDAY 5TH FEBRUARY

6.45pm School sports hall.

Sonja is back!! Tonight you are in for a treat so please, don’t be late!! .    

Inside : Lung busters

Outside group. 6 x 3mins/ 1 min rec 5k pace.

THURSDAY 6TH FEBRUARY (social run*)

7pm sharp, Starting from Sneck Yate (easy 10.7k 😉.

Bring a clean t-shirt and some beer tokens for refreshments afterwards.

SATURDAY 8TH FEBRUARY

Rosie Gatenby is aiming to complete her 100th Park Run at Fountains Abbey this Saturday; please come and support her on this wonderful achievement.

Message from the head-coach:

Since Christmas I have been running my weekend long run on either a Thursday or Friday night mainly because the trails are good, and the weather is so mild. This can sometimes mean I’m a little tired when I compete, but it gives me time on a weekend to spend with Christine and the Grandkids and also trying to keep everyone happy. It also has the advantage that I can train at a higher intensity during the core work on a Monday night because I’m not so tired. It’s all a matter of fitting it all in and at the moment it seems to be going ok

6TH – 8TH NOVEMBER

Harriers, Lakes weekend, Glaramara Hotel in Seatoller, Borrowdale. A fantastic weekend in the Lakes to enjoy, running, walking and relaxing amongst friends.  Rooms still available and can be booked directly with the hotel on 017687 77222.  If you would like to know more about the weekend, please speak to Helen.

When booking ensure you say you are from Thirsk and Sowerby Harriers.

FUTURE RACE LISTS

Trail Series – starting at 10 am, enter on the day

Race 5 – 23rd February – Holme House Prison 5k Trail (All the money for this event goes to charity)

Holme House Rd, Stockton-on-Tees TS18 2QU

Series Presentation Race 6: 22nd March – Saltburn 5k Trail (TBC)

Fell Races (check necessary kit list)

Feb 2nd – Glaisdale Rigg, Glaisdale pub (start 10:30am)

Feb 23rd – Heartbeat Hobble, Goathland village hall (start 11:00am)

 

Club Championship fixtures

Feb 23rd – Holme House Prison, Stockton, 5k Trail – Sun am enter on the day

Mar 1st – XC Croft

Mar 29th – Hartlepool Marina 5- entries open now

Apr 28th – Spring Coast Road 5k – TUESDAY evening, 7.15.  Flat! Entries open Jan 1st

May 6th – Gribdale Growler Fell Race (Wed evening)

May 19th – HDSRL Nidd Valley (Tues evening)

May 31st – Ripon 10

June 18th – HDSRL Ilkley (Prov) Thursday evening)

June 25th – HDSRL Skipton (Thursday evening)

July 12th – Kilburn 7 (Sun pm)

July 26th – James Herriot 14k (Fell) – Entries open

Aug 9th – Darlington 10k

Aug 19th – Sessay Swift 6k (Wed evening)

Sept 13th – Tholthorpe 10k Entries open

Sept 27th – Redcar Half Marathon

Oct 25th – Whixley 10k

Nov 1st – Guy Fawkes 10 – Entries open

Nov/Dec – XC to be arranged

Other Races

Feb 9th – Muddy Boots 10k, Ripon. Speaks for itself.  11am

May 24th – Melmerby 10k start 11:30am

Liv weekly blog

PART III: AFTER ALTITUDE TRAINING (little experiment in 2016)

I went for a run and it seemed windier than usual. With every stride the wind slapped me in the face. However, it wasn’t the British weather being predictable British weather. In fact, it wasn’t actually windy at all. I was just running faster than usual…

The effects of training at altitude usually last about two weeks when back at sea-level. Trying to ignore the pestering jet-lag, I was excited to give my hemoglobin-filled legs a whirl at the local park run. Clustered at the start line, I was surrounded by happy joggers, a black Labrador and a man pushing two prams (one with each arm). What I didn’t expect was that I almost felt like an imposter… or at least like I had done something wrong. Is this classed as cheating? Judging by how easy my easy run was yesterday, even stood at the start-line I knew I was going to get a PB. But it’s OK! Altitude training is legal! I kept telling myself. But is it a faster way to get faster? Time to find out…

I knocked 18 seconds off my Fountains Abbey Park Run, turning 19.51 into 19.33. Half joyful, half critical – it seemed more of a tempo run than a race-pace and I definitely had some left in the tank at the finish. But, a PB nonetheless. Plus, I must save myself, for next week is what I’ve really been waiting for… The Half Marathon.

Like many runners, I had put far too much pressure on myself. The ‘just enjoy it’ advice seemed to be buried and violently punched by the fact that I had just spent nearly 3 months altitude training… GIRL, YOU BETTER RUN FASTER THAN USUAL.

My over-ambitious 1 hour 30 goal was about to be put to the test at the Windsor Half Marathon. I say over-ambitious because it means knocking a chunky 9 minutes off my previous best time. However, night-before-nerves were settled by reminding myself what Coach Andrew Kastor tells his athletes before a race: “The hay is in the barn.” Basically meaning, don’t worry. All the hard work has been done. It’s time to race.

I realised when running those 13.1 miles what has physically happened to my body this summer – stronger quads, more resilient calves, bigger lungs… Well, all that is secondary really. The main thing I believe I have gained from the experience of training at altitude is the mental attitude and strength. During mile 7, as my focus began to dwindle, I remembered the feeling I had in the mountains on my ‘easy never easy’ run, with snot and dribble smearing across my cheek. Push on, push on, reach that feeling. Then at mile 10, as I began to doubt that I would have the power to reach my goal time, I remembered the positivity that surrounded all the athletes at Mammoth Lakes. I can do this. I will surprise myself. My body is amazing. I told myself.

So, is altitude training a faster way to get faster? I believe so, yes. But you can also reap the benefits by pushing yourself on a more regular basis when training at sea-level too. The most important thing is to have self-belief – both during training and during races. Set goals that scare you.

Thanks to training at altitude, I knocked 10 minutes off my Half Marathon time. I ran Windsor Half in 1 hour 29 minutes. On a euphoric high, I am now hungry for the next race. But first, a chocolate milkshake, please.

Rob’s weekly blog and training update w/c 27/01/2020

REMEMBER TO BRING YOUR 2020 MEMBERSHIP FORMS. See either myself or Trish

Ideally bring the form back and then please pay by BACS to: Natwest Acc 556137 06224598

“Liv weekly blog” – see below

Also, FULL LIST of Championship fixtures for 2020 – Note Spring Coast 5k has moved to 28th April

MONDAY 27TH JANUARY

Briefing at 7pm, Thirsk School Thirsk School Gym. Clean shoes please. Rolling core work inside

Outdoors. Ken is taking an outside group. We will probably be on Topcliffe Road as the field is a little wet at the moment.

Also 7pm Swimming pool. Molly continues the walking and talking group.

TUESDAY 28TH JANUARY (social run*)

Social run from Thirsk and Sowerby leisure centre at 7pm (meet in foyer) on well-lit paths and pavements. Suitable for all abilities; there will be several stops to run back/regroup, no-one runs by themselves or gets left behind. New and returning Tuesday night runners always welcome.

Route to be decided on the night, around 5 miles. Please wear high vis.

WEDNESDAY 29TH JANUARY

7pm Kilburn woods, ( Osgodby bank car park) monthly time trial. First runners to start at 7.20. We will require 2-3 helpers and a group of stronger runners to arrive early and help check the course for any fresh fallen debris, something that can easily be done during a warm up. For those wanting a bigger work out then I don’t see any reason why you can’t do it twice but you need to set off first. Give a five minute recovery then do it again.

THURSDAY 30TH JANUARY (social run*)

7pm sharp, Starting from Church in Helmsley along the Cleveland way then back down along the river.

Bring a clean t-shirt and some beer tokens for refreshments afterwards at the Brewery.

 

Message from the head-coach:

The cross country at Ormesby was very muddy and very tough going. If you can’t get good traction in mud you lose speed, waste energy and it takes you longer to get to the finish. I can no longer get through the mud like I used to be able to and I find it very frustrating. I wore a pair of Hoka “speed goat” trail shoes which are perfectly ok on trail but show them some mud and the legs go in all directions. I need to try something a little bit different before I run in mud again.

Thursday ( on purpose and because I could) I finished work early to arrive at Sutton Bank in the late afternoon to watch the sun drop down over the Pennines as I ran along the Cleveland way. I did a 60 minute time trial / tempo run between Sutton Bank to just beyond Snek Yate and back. I love the undulations; I love the uneven surface and I love the isolation. It was dark when I arrived back, and the car park was empty. 7.2 mile, 740′ of ascent, 142 pulse and 170 strides/min. For me at this very minute life doesn’t get much better than this. I will worry about tomorrow when it arrives!!! 

6TH – 8TH NOVEMBER

Harriers, Lakes weekend, Glaramara Hotel in Seatoller, Borrowdale. A fantastic weekend in the Lakes to enjoy, running, walking and relaxing amongst friends.  Rooms still available and can be booked directly with the hotel on 017687 77222.  If you would like to know more about the weekend, please speak to Helen.

When booking ensure you say you are from Thirsk and Sowerby Harriers.

FUTURE RACE LISTS

Trail Series – starting at 10 am, enter on the day

Race 4 – 26th January – The Acorn 5k Trail

Acorn Sports Centre, Heythrop Dr, Acklam, Middlesbrough TS5 8QB

Race 5 – 23rd February – Holme House Prison 5k Trail (All the money for this event goes to charity)

Holme House Rd, Stockton-on-Tees TS18 2QU

Series Presentation Race 6: 22nd March – Saltburn 5k Trail (TBC)

Fell Races (check necessary kit list)

Feb 2nd – Glaisdale Rigg, Glaisdale pub (start 10:30am)

Feb 23rd – Heartbeat Hobble, Goathland village hall (start 11:00am)

 

Club Championship fixtures

Feb 23rd – Holme House Prison, Stockton, 5k Trail – Sun am enter on the day

Mar 1st – XC Croft

Mar 29th – Hartlepool Marina 5- entries open now

Apr 28th – Spring Coast Road 5k – TUESDAY evening, 7.15.  Flat! Entries open Jan 1st

May 6th – Gribdale Growler Fell Race (Wed evening)

May 19th – HDSRL Nidd Valley (Tues evening)

May 31st – Ripon 10

June 18th – HDSRL Ilkley (Prov) Thursday evening)

June 25th – HDSRL Skipton (Thursday evening)

July 12th – Kilburn 7 (Sun pm)

July 26th – James Herriot 14k (Fell) – Entries open

Aug 9th – Darlington 10k

Aug 19th – Sessay Swift 6k (Wed evening)

Sept 13th – Tholthorpe 10k Entries open

Sept 27th – Redcar Half Marathon

Oct 25th – Whixley 10k

Nov 1st – Guy Fawkes 10 – Entries open

Nov/Dec – XC to be arranged

Other Races

Feb 9th – Muddy Boots 10k, Ripon. Speaks for itself.  11am

May 24th – Melmerby 10k start 11:30am

 

Liv weekly blog

PART II: DURING ALTITUDE TRAINING (little experiment in 2016).

Have you ever run with cold or flu – where it feels like somebody (a rather large somebody) is sitting on your chest? Or have you ever tried to run hard the day after a big race – where your body feels like a heavy lump or maybe a car-crash victim? That is what it feels like to train at altitude.

How has it only been 8 and a half minutes!? I thought to myself, gazing down at my watch, assuming I must be nearing a half marathon distance, at least. I have realised first hand that struggling to catch your breath, general fatigue and longer recovery times are all common symptoms of being closer to the clouds. Even walking up the stairs, I’d be wheezing, feeling like an asthmatic 90-year-old.

Most studies show that it takes 21 days for your body to adapt to the stresses of altitude and gain a training benefit. I took my first week at 8,000ft very easy, cautious of putting such a stress on my body. It is recommended to decrease your weekly mileage by about 25% for the first week, and make sure it is easy running. The body will be working hard to produce new red blood cells and shift them around the body. Easy running will help allow this process.

 ‘Easy’ running. Good joke.

But one can’t complain. The Eastern Sierra offers the snow-capped mountains’ reflection in the mirrored lakes, the bald eagle swooping over shades of forest green and for my eardrums to be filled with a poetic silence – all before breakfast, on my 4 mile ‘easy’ run. Quite literally, breath-taking.

As a visitor, not knowing anyone but keen to improve my running times, it would be a good idea to meet some people to run with, I thought. Lo and behold, Mammoth Track Club. As I researched some more about the club, I was both intimidated and intrigued. This is where the elite train. I, certainly, am not elite. Will I make a fool of myself?

In what world can a pop-star-wannabe go and spend the afternoon with Beyonce? In what world can a Hogwarts fanatic go and have lunch with J.K Rowling? How is it that I, an amateur lover of running, am welcomed with open arms to train with some Olympians? Baffled, excited, nervous – I laced up my trainers and headed out the door…

My first Thursday evening session consisted of:

1.5mile warm up

400m hill, maximum effort x5 (recovery is jog down)

1.5mile cool down

Stretching with foam rollers

Drinks and pretzels and chats!

During the cool down, a woman just behind me said, “wow, sweetie! You did so well!” I quickly turned round, smiling like a Cheshire cat, and said, “Aww thank you! My quads were hurting a bit, but I really enjoyed it.”

Guess what? She was not talking to me. She was talking to her dog.

As painfully awkward as that was, it was certainly laughed off. And see what I mean about casual and fun? A dog came along too!

Mammoth Track Club is exceptional. Not just in the superior talent that it produces, but in its nature: kind, encouraging, welcoming, inspiring. Not only does it offer sessions to improve fitness, form and speed, but after each session, I came away feeling mentally, more positive.

Olympian Deena Kastor (American female record holder for the marathon) is energetic, humble and gracious. I was certainly deflated when even after 3 weeks of training, my times still seemed so much slower than back at home. She encouraged me that training at altitude will always be hard, but when I get back to sea-level, both mentally and physically, the time I spent running in beautiful, challenging Mammoth, will help me achieve my goals. Her husband and coach, Andrew Kastor, also inspired me not to give up. He assured me that aerobic power and endurance may be 1%-8% slower than at sea level. The longer the distance, the greater the difference. I need to be understanding that my usual pace at sea-level will be strained while running at altitude due to the lower concentration of oxygen. Even when acclimated, expected handicaps are 2 to 2.5 minutes slower for 10K, 50 seconds for 5K, 10-15seconds for 2K, 4 to 8 seconds for 1K.

My mission here was straightforward: I wanted a faster way to get faster. At altitude, each session is harder than any session that could be offered at sea-level. In addition, here in Mammoth Lakes, you can’t escape the hills, helping the legs to become stronger and more powerful. And you certainly can’t escape the beauty, making you really want to lace up your trainers each day and make the most of it.

I knew I had to be careful though and not get too carried away. Rest is so important. I made it priority to listen to my own body and ran 5 days per week as opposed to 6 days in London. That doesn’t sound like a huge difference, I realise that. However, I really obeyed the word ‘rest.’ A rest day means doing nothing (except eating and sleeping). Not spending a day shopping with friends, not having a house party, but resting. Deena says that, “there is no such thing as over-training. But there is certainly a danger of not having sufficient rest.”

After almost 3 months, I knew my body felt stronger and fitter and I, myself, felt more positive about what the future holds. Thank you, Mammoth. Most importantly, thank you, Mammoth Track Club.

Next stop, London. Will I, a club runner, have reaped the benefits of altitude training that the professionals swear by?

“I don’t feel the stress; I only feel the benefits it brings.” – Deena Kastor.

Rob’s weekly blog and training update w/c 20/01/2020

REMEMBER TO BRING YOUR 2020 MEMBERSHIP FORMS. See either myself or Trish

Ideally bring the form back and then please pay by BACS to: Natwest Acc 556137 06224598

“Liv weekly blog” – see below

Also, FULL LIST of Championship fixtures for 2020 – Note Spring Coast 5k has moved to 28th April

SUNDAY 19TH JANUARY

CHAMPIONSHIP RACE – NYSD Cross Country (Separate email already sent)

Ormesby Hall, Church Lane, Ormesby, Middlesbrough, TS7 9AS

Please use the Church Lane entrance to the Hall NOT the main gate entrance from Ladgate Lane.

Ormesby Hall cross country. See details attached. We will have a tent and I will bring some spare club vests for those who don’t have one. You need to register with your team captain (Alison will pick up the folder so please don’t approach the time keepers) if you don’t already have a number. Bring some pins to attach your number to your vest. I do have some spares but only as a last resort. It will be wet and muddy so expect a tough race but there are fast and easier sections too .

MONDAY 20TH JANUARY

Briefing at 7pm, Thirsk School Thirsk School Gym. Clean shoes please. Rolling core work inside

Outdoors. Ken and Duncan are taking an outside group. We will probably be on Topcliffe Road as the field is a little wet at the moment.

Also 7pm Swimming pool. Molly continues the walking and talking group.

TUESDAY 21ST JANUARY (social run*)

Social run from Thirsk and Sowerby leisure centre at 7pm (meet in foyer) on well-lit paths and pavements. Suitable for all abilities; there will be several stops to run back/regroup, no-one runs by themselves or gets left behind. New and returning Tuesday night runners always welcome.

Route to be decided on the night, around 5 miles. Please wear high vis.

WEDNESDAY 22ND JANUARY

6.45pm School sports hall. I am usually all set up and ready to go by 6.45 for those wishing for a big session.  Inside rolling core work with 28 minutes of continuous effort. Cross over the hall in equal ability pairs. If we have a similar turnout as last week then there will not be too much room. Please be careful as you turn around.

Last Wednesday night we had a big, big session and everyone worked hard together. We will have one bigger one and then ease down the following week for a time trial. Please don’t waste this momentum, join in with all the energy around you. Let’s all improve and get stronger together.

Outside group. 2 x (2 x 4mins) / 1 min recovery (2 min recovery between sets).

Inside : Lung busters with Paul.

THURSDAY 23RD JANUARY (social run*)

7pm sharp, Starting from Sutton Bank visitors centre.

Bring a clean t-shirt and some beer tokens for refreshments afterwards.

6TH – 8TH NOVEMBER

Harriers, Lakes weekend, Glaramara Hotel in Seatoller, Borrowdale. A fantastic weekend in the Lakes to enjoy, running, walking and relaxing amongst friends.  Rooms still available and can be booked directly with the hotel on 017687 77222.  If you would like to know more about the weekend, please speak to Helen.

When booking ensure you say you are from Thirsk and Sowerby Harriers.

FUTURE RACE LISTS

Trail Series – starting at 10 am, enter on the day

Race 4 – 26th January – The Acorn 5k Trail

Acorn Sports Centre, Heythrop Dr, Acklam, Middlesbrough TS5 8QB

Race 5 – 23rd February – Holme House Prison 5k Trail (All the money for this event goes to charity)

Holme House Rd, Stockton-on-Tees TS18 2QU

Series Presentation Race 6: 22nd March – Saltburn 5k Trail (TBC)

Fell Races (check necessary kit list)

Feb 2nd – Glaisdale Rigg, Glaisdale pub (start 10:30am)

Feb 23rd – Heartbeat Hobble, Goathland village hall (start 11:00am)

 

Club Championship fixtures

Jan 19th – XC Ormesby Hall – Can be muddy. Challenging – Sun am

Feb 23rd – Holme House Prison, Stockton, 5k Trail – Sun am enter on the day

Mar 1st – XC Croft

Mar 29th – Hartlepool Marina 5- entries open now

Apr 28th – Spring Coast Road 5k – TUESDAY evening, 7.15.  Flat! Entries open Jan 1st

May 6th – Gribdale Growler Fell Race (Wed evening)

May 19th – HDSRL Nidd Valley (Tues evening)

May 31st – Ripon 10

June 18th – HDSRL Ilkley (Prov) Thursday evening)

June 25th – HDSRL Skipton (Thursday evening)

July 12th – Kilburn 7 (Sun pm)

July 26th – James Herriot 14k (Fell) – Entries open

Aug 9th – Darlington 10k

Aug 19th – Sessay Swift 6k (Wed evening)

Sept 13th – Tholthorpe 10k Entries open

Sept 27th – Redcar Half Marathon

Oct 25th – Whixley 10k

Nov 1st – Guy Fawkes 10 – Entries open

Nov/Dec – XC to be arranged

Other Races

Feb 9th – Muddy Boots 10k, Ripon. Speaks for itself.  11am

May 24th – Melmerby 10k start 11:30am

Liv weekly blog

Below is an article that I wrote a couple of years ago. It’s a 3 part thing, so more to come. Re-reading it, it makes me miss running more than ever before.

Altitude training: A faster way to get faster?

PART I: BEFORE

We, as humans, are always looking for faster ways.

Gone are the days when we contemplated between a first and a second class stamp. The carefully handwritten letter somehow turned into a fax, which, before we knew it, became an email. And now, sometimes an email isn’t quite fast enough. We are greedy speed demons. As we frantically refresh our inbox, we’ll send out a WhatsApp message too.

It seems, we are obsessed with the quickest way. Quick fix diets, quick fix facials, quick fix tooth whitening and stain removal.

I too, was after a faster way. A faster way to get faster. You see, I wanted to get quicker at running, but I wanted to see positive results in the fastest possible way.

I wanted to take a pill (a legal one of course) that will make me stride like Usain Bolt. Or drink a juice that will give me Paula Radcliffe’s mental attitude and pain threshold. Then I would buy a foam roller that will have healing powers so strong, injuries and niggles wouldn’t even bother me and I’d get a fast-track pass to the podium every time.

Failing this, I was up for giving a tried and tested ‘quick fix’ for runners a go…

Altitude training.

I’m a keen club runner. I’ll admit that I have had a good few years running, however, throughout 2016, my PBs had been a tad ‘stand still.’

Actually, ‘stand still’ may be rather complimentary. If anything, I had become slower.

BUT, ‘stand still’ / backwards no more. The mountains were calling and I was about to jet off to Mammoth Lakes, California (8,000ft above sea level).

Word on the street is that there is a great running community in Mammoth. The mission of the Mammoth Track Club is to support athletic and academic achievement, develop professional athleticism and promote lifelong health and fitness through running in a high altitude environment.

But what will actually happen to my body when I run up in the mountains? When training at altitude, levels of EPO (a hormone that stimulates the production of red blood cells) increases. Studies have shown that this increase can translate into a 3 percent boost in race performance. Better still, there is some evidence that non-elite athletes, who have a lower level of hemoglobin (the protein in red blood cells) may experience an even better and quicker boost than the professionals! (Great news for me).

The biological effects for a competitive advantage when returning to sea level, usually lasts about 14 days. When discovering this I thought, ‘Oh. Is that it?’ However, the mental strength gained from training sessions at altitude, are sure to last a lifetime. Most coaches recommend spending at least two weeks at altitude in order to gain noticeable fitness benefits. I was in a very lucky position where I had the whole summer to spare – so, ‘three months at 8,000ft it is,’ I thought.

But, why Mammoth? Since 2001, the Mammoth Track Club has built many national champions, Olympic medalists and record holders, including Deena Kastor (American female record holder for the marathon).

Both Deena and 2009 New York Marathon champion Meb Keflezighi can be found pounding the pavements here. “Such a challenge in training makes racing at sea level much easier,” says Keflezighi.

“The appeal is a combination of breath-taking scenery, challenging running routes and the community’s support of athletic endeavors. It’s also a place where snow-capped mountains, peaceful forests and bald eagles are often the runner’s only companion.” (www.visitmammoth.com)

I WAS SOLD.

I was excited to meet the running community and couldn’t wait to get started. Can training in a climate where oxygen is limited, really shed seconds (minutes!?) off my times when I return to sea level?

Rob’s weekly blog and training update w/c 13/01/20

REMEMBER TO BRING YOUR 2020 MEMBERSHIP FORMS.  See either myself or Trish

 Ideally bring the form back and then please pay by BACS to: Natwest Acc 556137 06224598

 

“Liv weekly blog” – see below

Also, FULL LIST of Championship fixtures for 2020

MONDAY 13TH JANUARY

Briefing at 7pm, Thirsk School Thirsk School Gym. Clean shoes please. Rolling core work inside

Outdoors. Ken and Duncan are taking an outside group.

2 mins effort / 30 secs rest / 2mins effort / 1min rest;

4 mins effort / 1 min rest / 4mins effort / 1min rest;

2 mins effort / 30 secs rest / 2mins effort / 1min rest;

4 mins effort / 1 min rest / 4mins effort / 1min rest;

Total 30mins

Also 7pm Swimming pool. Molly continues the walking and talking group. 

TUESDAY 14TH JANUARY (social run*)

Social run from Thirsk and Sowerby leisure centre at 7pm (meet in foyer) on well-lit paths and pavements. Suitable for all abilities; there will be several stops to run back/regroup, no-one runs by themselves or gets left behind. New and returning Tuesday night runners always welcome.

Route to be decided on the night, around 5 miles. Please wear high vis.

WEDNESDAY 15TH JANUARY

6.45pm School sports hall.  This week there will be an increase from 35 to 40 seconds because it makes it easier for Nigel doing the time keeping. However, Nigel would like to take part so if there is anyone a little bit on the injury side, then we have a job just for you. ( being injured is not an excuse for not being fit, it just means you may not be able to run!)  

Outside group.  8 x 2 mins @ 10k pace / 30 secs recovery. This one will shock you if you don’t get your pace right. 

Inside : Lung busters with Paul.

THURSDAY 16TH JANUARY (social run*)

7pm sharp, Starting from Sutton Bank visitors centre.

Bring a clean t-shirt and some beer tokens for refreshments afterwards.

SUNDAY 19TH JANUARY

CHAMPIONSHIP RACE  – NYSD Cross Country (Separate email already sent)

Ormesby Hall, Church Lane, Ormesby, Middlesbrough, TS7 9AS

Please use the Church Lane entrance to the Hall NOT the main gate entrance from Ladgate Lane.

Message from the head-coach:

It is now almost the middle of January and for some this will be week three into a new training program. This week should be a strong, productive, roll your sleeves up week. You start off steady and build up gradually, it’s time to stop talking and go out and do. Good luck with your training and show me your progress at training next week. Rob

 

6TH – 8TH NOVEMBER

Harriers, Lakes weekend, Glaramara Hotel in Seatoller, Borrowdale.  A fantastic weekend in the Lakes to enjoy, running, walking and relaxing amongst friends.  Rooms still available and can be booked directly with the hotel on 017687 77222.  If you would like to know more about the weekend, please speak to Helen.

When booking ensure you say you are from Thirsk and Sowerby Harriers.

FUTURE RACE LISTS

Trail Series  – starting at 10 am, enter on the day

Race 4 – 26th January – The Acorn 5k Trail

Acorn Sports Centre, Heythrop Dr, Acklam, Middlesbrough TS5 8QB

Race 5 – 23rd February – Holme House Prison 5k Trail (All the money for this event goes to charity)

Holme House Rd, Stockton-on-Tees TS18 2QU

Series Presentation Race 6: 22nd March – Saltburn 5k Trail (TBC)

Fell Races (check necessary kit list)

Feb 2nd – Glaisdale Rigg, Glaisdale pub (start 10:30am)

Feb 23rd – Heartbeat Hobble, Goathland village hall (start 11:00am)

 

Club Championship fixtures

Jan 19th – XC Ormesby Hall – Can be muddy.  Challenging – Sun am

Feb 23rd – Holme House Prison, Stockton, 5k Trail – Sun am enter on the day

Mar 1st – XC Croft

Mar 29th – Hartlepool Marina 5- entries open now

Apr 29th – Spring Coast Road 5k -Wed evening, 7.15.  Flat! Entries open Jan 1st

May 6th – Gribdale Growler Fell Race (Wed evening)

May 19th – HDSRL Nidd Valley (Tues evening)

May 31st – Ripon 10

June 18th – HDSRL Ilkley (Prov) Thursday evening)

June 25th – HDSRL Skipton (Thursday evening)

July 12th – Kilburn 7 (Sun pm)

July 26th – James Herriot 14k (Fell) – Entries open

Aug 9th – Darlington 10k

Aug 19th – Sessay Swift 6k (Wed evening)

Sept 13th – Tholthorpe 10k Entries open

Sept 27th – Redcar Half Marathon

Oct 25th – Whixley 10k

Nov 1st – Guy Fawkes 10 – Entries open

Nov/Dec – XC to be arranged

Other Races

Feb 9th – Muddy Boots 10k, Ripon.  Speaks for itself.  11am

May 24th – Melmerby 10k start 11:30am
 

Liv weekly blog

The desire to run is in the genes

My Dad (Tom) is my number 1 supporter at all my running races. Before each race he’ll smile a wicked smile and say, “it’s in the genes kid!”

People run to get fitter. People run to win races. People run to lose weight. People run to raise money for charity. People run to increase wellbeing. People run to show depression who’s boss. People run to make friends. People run to be alone. People run to think. People run to not think.

I can certainly circle a few of the above as to why, like many others, I found running. I’m one of many, you see.

That’s why I’m not going to tell my story, but tell you my Dad’s story. He discovered running because he wanted to get home.

Imagine the sound of a gunshot. No visuals. Just that noise. A deafening gunshot. One shot. Fired with purpose.

Let me take you to Aden. 1967

The sun beats down. Two men are running towards us. They are in combat, carrying guns. The skinny man is considerably faster although both are struggling, both are panicked, running for their lives. The small, faster man, no taller than 5’7 is Tom.

The sound of an explosion.

Both men crash down onto the sandy ground. Tom is trembling. His face dirty, sweaty and bloody. Dave, breathing heavily, crawls over to Tom.

“Y’alright mate?” asks Dave.

Tom replies. Just. “What the f*** are we doing.”

In Aden, days in the desert merge into weeks, which merge into months. There is thick fencing and barbed wire that surrounds the camp. No man or beast could climb it. Rows upon rows of olive drab tents sit inside the 3km perimeter of fencing. 

Explosion. Gunshot. Love letters. Explosion. Gunshot. Dirt. Sweat. Blood. Gunshot.

Tom dreamt of Home.

Inside the tent, tanned faces appear through smoky air. Men are sat smoking and drinking. Even without music, the atmosphere is buzzing.  A short, fat man with red cheeks, dressed in formal uniform appears. He proudly wears his maroon beret although looking at him, you would never guess that he was in the Parachute Regiment. This is Commanding Officer: a Lieutenant Colonel, who affectionately goes by the nickname, Piggy. As Tom puts it, “his face looks like a well slapped arse” and “he speaks dead proper.”

The tent suddenly falls silent as Piggy projects: “The first battalion, the Parachute Regiment, are going to win the army Cross-country championships. The selection process will be in 4 weeks time. Those selected will go home 6 weeks early –“

He has Tom’s full attention.

“ – you will have the best drink, best food, all the kit. You will basically become professional sportsmen for the next 6 months. The first 10 in the cross country race will be selected. If you are selected there will be no further guard duties and you will wear a Para Reg. tracksuit full-time.”

Tom puts down his drink and cigarette.

Outside the tent, the pitch black sky is speckled with stars. Pretending to be sober, Tom lunges twice. He tries to touch is toes but is a long way off. He cracks his neck from side to side. He begins to sprint. He runs around the inside of the fence for about 15 seconds, then stops, breathing heavily. He jogs a few strides and then throws up his beer.

The next morning, Bert Gordon (the best runner in the regiment) hands Tom a book titled: ‘NO BUGLES, NO DRUMS: EMIL ZATOPEK.’ Tom opens a page at random and it reads: “An athlete cannot run with money in his pockets. He must run with hope in his heart and dreams in his head.” Tom swiftly closes the book and pops it under his armpit. “Cheers for this Bert. I’ll get reading. And running, of course.”

That very afternoon, Tom is running around the inside of the fence. He sidesteps around the place that he was sick last night.

 ‘Running never gets any easier, you just get faster.’

For those 4 weeks before the race, day in, day out, Tom would practice running faster. Running made him feel a concoction of emotions – frustrated, determined, elated. Running made him feel lonely but also made him feel part of something. Running gave him purpose.

Other side of the fence: Race Day

60 or so men are waiting to start. We see Tom. His heart seems to beat louder than the noise of the crowd.

On your marks. Get set.

The sound of a gun shot.

The competitors sprint off from the start. Tom propels forward with all of this might. His breathing is louder than the athletic stampede. His eyes glare a hungry desire. Bert Gordon makes it look effortless, and he strides past Tom.

 ‘He must run with hope in his heart and dreams in his head.’

Tom, without welcome, experiences a flashback. He sees himself on the ground, trembling. His face is dirty, sweaty and bloody.

Back to the present moment, Tom touches his side and grits his teeth. His arms, although small, look powerful.

Tom did not win the race, but he did make the team. His efforts had been worth it, or so he thought. 

That evening, the 10 runners that made the team surround Piggy.

 “Dead legs I expect but it really was a great race, great race. Now, are you all aware what is expected of you over the coming months?”

 “Yes Sir.”

 “The first battalion, the Parachute Regiment, will win.”

 “Yes Sir.”

 “Of course, you must acclimatise…. It has been up to 40 degrees here. You can’t go straight back to England after training in that. You will do the first half of your training in Bahrain, 10 to 15 degrees cooler. You will then head back 12 weeks later, on October 16th, arriving in England 5 weeks later than originally planned. Do I make myself clear?”

The men pause, then reluctantly reply. “Yes Sir.”

 “Do I make myself clear?”

“Yes Sir.”

Back to the present day, I ask my Dad if he was angry? Angry that after all his efforts to come back home to safety and back to his family were for nothing? He shook his head.

He had found running. The strict routine of training gave him purpose and determination. Not just a determined attitude to become faster at running, but an attitude towards life – an ability to be grateful. Embracing the fact that you only have one life and whatever the task may be, we should always strive to give it our all. Understanding that life is precious.

He (knowingly or not) passed this attitude onto his daughter (myself). I run to feel alive.

Rob’s weekly blog and training update w/c 6/01/20

Happy New Year to you all – REMEMBER TO BRING YOUR 2020 MEMBERSHIP FORMS. See either myself or Trish

“Liv weekly blog” – see below

Also, some Championship fixtures for 2020

SUNDAY 5TH JANUARY

Jan 5th – Commondale Beacon, village hall (start 10:30am) – check necessary kit list

MONDAY 6TH JANUARY

7pm. Outside the racecourse entrance. Station road. Split into different speed ability groups. Interval session. Let’s see what you all got for Christmas!!

TUESDAY 7TH JANUARY (social run*)

Social run from Thirsk and Sowerby leisure centre at 7pm (meet in foyer) on well-lit paths and pavements. Suitable for all abilities; there will be several stops to run back/regroup, no-one runs by themselves or gets left behind. New and returning Tuesday night runners always welcome.

Route to be decided on the night, around 5 miles. Please wear high vis.

WEDNESDAY 8TH JANUARY

6.45pm School sports hall. First half/ rolling core session. Second half. Inside, intense speed work. Outside. 5 x 3 mins/ 1 rec. @ 5k pace. 

After the Christmas break, we all need to get back into a regular training routine, whatever it might be. Exercise is not just for Christmas but for the rest of your life!!

Message from the head-coach:

At the moment I am running around 21 minutes for 5k which is sort of ok for a guy of my age. For the past few weeks I have been adjusting my training to put in a good performance at the Captain Cooks fell race simply because I like running trail/fell and I like this particular course. The conditions for the race were almost perfect. I ran the climb just about as I planned, I descended a lot better than expected and I crossed the finish line almost totally spent. 3.5 minutes faster than last year and my fastest run for 4 years. My legs are still throbbing away. There are no results out as yet, but I don’t think I finished in the top 200. ( more than 500 altogether) I think the race was the strongest in depth group of athletes I have competed against in a fell race in all the years I have been running. I hope all of you who took part were inspired to put in some outstanding performances and that you enjoyed it. There were few prizes so most of the entrance fees went to charity. Thank you Mr Dave Parry.

Liv weekly blog

Talking is good, they say.

I’m included in that ‘they’ statement. I, too, believe that talking is good. Talking and sharing our problems helps us to heal.

But can we over-share? Can we tell too many details or perhaps risk sounding like a broken record speaking about our problems over and over again?

I went around to my parents house for dinner the other night and, to be quite honest, I was sick of talking. Sick of talking about myself. Sick of hearing ‘are you feeling better yet?’ ‘how was your appointment?’ ‘did you take all your pills today?’

Mum* answered the front door. I didn’t say hello. Instead, I went straight in with, “Can I ask you something?”

“Hi sweetheart. Yeah, what is it?”

“Can we please just have one night of not talking about any health stuff. No appointment chat.”

She first looked a little taken aback. But she soon smiled with her eyes and gestured I come in out of the rain. “Of course.”

 

You know what, as much as I believe a problem shared is a problem halved… having a night specifically not talking about ‘what’s wrong’ meant I had the best evening I have had in a long time… it was certainly the most ‘normal’ I have felt in a long time…

I wish all you good health for 2020 (and beyond!)

*some of you may remember my Mum from Sessay Swift 2019. After finishing, I ran back to find her…She took up running two years ago and is now 61. Seeing her huffing and puffing but grinning ear to ear filled me with pride. “This is my Mum! This is my Mum!” I called to the crowds as we approached the finish. “GO ON LIV’S MUM! GO ON LIV’S MUM!” You all shouted.

For future reference, her name is Carolyn. But don’t worry about that. I thought ‘Liv’s Mum’ was pretty cute.

FUTURE RACE LISTS

Trail Series – starting at 10 am, enter on the day

Race 4 – 26th January – The Acorn 5k Trail

Acorn Sports Centre, Heythrop Dr, Acklam, Middlesbrough TS5 8QB

Race 5 – 23rd February – Holme House Prison 5k Trail (All the money for this event goes to charity)

Holme House Rd, Stockton-on-Tees TS18 2QU

Series Presentation Race 6: 22nd March – Saltburn 5k Trail (TBC)

Fell Races (check necessary kit list)

Jan 5th – Commondale Beacon, village hall (start 10:30am)

Feb 2nd – Glaisdale Rigg, Glaisdale pub (start 10:30am)

Feb 23rd – Heartbeat Hobble, Goathland village hall (start 11:00am)

 

Club Championship fixtures

Jan 19th – XC Ormesby Hall – Can be muddy. Challenging – Sun am

Feb 23rd – Holme House Prison, Stockton, 5k Trail – Sun am enter on the day

Mar 1st – XC Croft

Mar 29th – Hartlepool Marina 5- entries open now

Apr 29th – Spring Coast Road 5k -Wed evening, 7.15. Flat! Entries open Jan 1st

 

Other Races

Feb 9th – Muddy Boots 10k, Ripon. Speaks for itself.  11am

May 24th – Melmerby 10k start 11:30am

Thirsk 10 - 2020

Sunday 15th March 2020

Click here for results

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